Capturing the essence of Ciutat Vella, Barcelona

Exploring the oldest district of Barcelona, Ciutat Vella, and wandering through its different neighbourhoods was an experience that really helped me get a feel of the urban culture of this bustling Catalan city.

Ciutat Vella comprises of four neighbourhoods: La Barceloneta, El Raval, El Gòtic and Sant Pere, Santa Caterina i La Ribera. It also has La Rambla- the (in)famous avenue that dissects through the old district with El Raval on one side and El Gòtic on the other. This street has always had more than its fair share of petty crime, naive tourists, overpriced products, and unwarranted client solicitation. The seediness continues into the adjacent suburb of El Raval, which gives it a distinctly urban, gritty feel. 

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La Rambla

From the streets of El Raval

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MACBA: Museu d’Art Contemporani de Barcelona

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Antic Hospital de la Santa Creu (14th century): Barcelona’s first hospital to admit female patients was also the biggest of its time. Incidentally, it also became the place where Gaudí passed away. Notice the red and yellow striped Catalan flag. 
La Boqueria
Mercat de la Boqueria

A walk through El Barri Gòtic

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Basilica de Santa Maria del Pi 
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Basilica de Santa Maria del Mar

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Parc de la Ciutadella and Arc de Triomf

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Parc de la Ciutadella
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Barcelona’s Arc de Triomf was modelled after L’Arc de Triomphe de l’Étoile in Paris, although its design derived some inpiration from Southern Spain’s Moorish past. It was constructed for 1888 Barcelona World Fair as the main entrance gate. 

La Barceloneta

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The man made beaches of Barcelona: these beaches were only constructed when the city decided to host Olympics in 1992. They are very popular though- with around 7 million people visiting them each year (not sure why, as they are nothing compared to Aussie beaches).

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